A British-Iranian woman jailed in Tehran has been deprived of telephone calls and contact with her family and husband in U.K. during the Nowruz holidays. Officials claim permission for such contacts must be issued by the Prosecutor and interrogators.

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe had worked for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, a London-based charity. She was detained last April as she tried to leave Iran after a family visit with her two-year-old daughter.

Her daughter’s passport was confiscated and she is now being looked after by family members in Iran.

Prison authorities are denying Mrs. Zaghari-Ratcliffe hospital treatment despite her acute conditions.

The 38-year-old had an operation on her neck in 2014 and needs special exercise and treatment. However, she is being denied access to medical care outside the prison.

“Her neck and back problems have worsened over the last few months. Without urgent treatment Nazanin runs the risk of permanent impairment,” according to the woman’s husband Richard Ratcliffe.

Zaghari-Ratcliffe suffers from neck vertebrae damage caused by months of having no bed, poor exercise and stress.

The doctor expressed concerns about Nazanin’s neck and shoulder, as well as nerves in her right arm and hand. Prison doctors ordered her hospitalized on February 4th and said she should be admitted to a neurology hospital immediately or she could be left with a permanent injury.

British-Iranian aid worker has been sentenced to five years behind bars for “measures threatening national security.”

When she was in solitary confinement in Kerman, central Iran, Nazanin was forced to sign forged confessions, Richard Ratcliffe said to the media outlet.

Two months after she was arrested Iran’s Revolutionary Guards announced she has been detained for allegedly “plotting to topple the government” and transferred her to Kerman.