Iran: Prison Officials Refuse Medical Treatment for Sick Prisoner

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Ardebil central prison authorities have refused to send a sick prisoner to the infirmary or a health centre since the end of his hunger strike.
The political prisoner Mohammad Saber Malek-Reisi, incarcerated in central prison of Ardebil, is suffering from medical conditions, including gastrointestinal problems due to long-term hunger strikes.
However, the prison authorities refuse to provide medical treatment to the prisoner. The prison doctor told him “I do not visit you; you should not have gone on hunger strike; you should have thought about the consequences of this before the strike.”
In the past days, the security officer, named Sha’bani, has repeatedly prevented Mohammad Saber from going to the prison infirmary.
This political prisoner has already lost about 24 kilos of his body weight in prison after a 39-day long hunger strike protesting the restrictions and pressure from prison authorities as well as beating and mayhem.
At the same time as nationwide protests in Iran started, he ended his hunger strike by sending a message and emphasizing that “in such a situation, the priority is to focus the attention of civil society and media on the nationwide protests in Iran.”
During the strike, Mohammad Saber was transferred to the quarantine of the central prison of Ardabil. The pressure on him to end the hunger strike and to accept the prison conditions was to such an extent that even the prison shop refused to give a bottle of mineral water to the prisoner and condition it to the end of the hunger strike.
The prison authorities have been depriving the prisoner of the right to call regularly and to meet with his family as a means of putting pressure on him.
Earlier, a number of political prisoners and prisoners of conscience, in a letter in defense of Mohammad Saber Malek Reisi, urged the UN Human Rights Commissioner and the Special Rapporteur on Human Rights in Iran to call on the Iranian regime to end the crackdown on national and religious minorities in Iran.

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